Monthly Archives: September 2015

Expansion into Vermilion History

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The work of the New Indian Ridge Museum might rightly be referred to as a project of “regional historical research and preservation.”  Col. Nahorn’s broad interest in local history certainly has led him beyond the bounds of Amherst.  More generally, the Museum focuses its preservation and documentation efforts on this general area of North Central Ohio.  Specifically, some of our most recent historical research and environmental studies have taken place along the scenic Vermilion River.  Our efforts have broadened slightly to this area, and we are very proud to call Vermilion a “second home town;” second to Amherst.

A postcard we recently acquired for the Museum's extensive and growing postcard collection. Postcards are ideal for the Museum, as they depict views of the past. In this particular case, however, this view of the second shale cliff has changed little over the years since this card was published.

A postcard we recently acquired for the Museum’s extensive and growing postcard collection. Postcards are ideal for the Museum, as they depict views of the past. In this particular case, however, this view of the second shale cliff along the River has changed little over the years since this card was published.

Vermilion is a unique and interesting town where both history and local watershed awareness mesh well together, just as in Amherst (Beaver Creek).  As a naturalist and guide at the West River Paddle Sports in town, Col. Nahorn has found it necessary to “brush up” on the aspects of local history and environmental issues of the Vermilion River Watershed.  From the often-mis-reported history behind Swift’s Hollow to Septarian nodules (turtle rocks) being readily found in the River, there are numerous little-known and interesting bits of trivia and factoids one can find of interest throughout the Watershed.

Septarian nodules/concretions ('turtle rocks') - natural formations - that can be found along the Vermilion River.

Septarian nodules/concretions (‘turtle rocks’) – natural formations – that can be found along the Vermilion River.

Learning, documenting, and preserving Vermilion-area history fits well with our Museum goals which guide preservation efforts at the Museum.  Since our first meeting early in 2015, working with Museum Board Member Vito Cammarata, we’ve learned much about the town, and we recently acquired 19th century maps of Vermilion; early 20th century postcards; books on Vermilion history for our research library; a very unique metal matchbook holder; and even an antique silver “souvenir” spoon from Vermilion.  We look forward to expanding into Vermilion’s history!

Very unique metal matchbook holder from Vermilion.

Very unique metal matchbook holder from Vermilion.

Silver Vermilion, Ohio souvenir spoon we recently acquired.  The word ‘October’ is on the reverse.