Monthly Archives: April 2017

Antler Match Set Found at Preserve

While beginning our annual task of the removal of non-native invasive garlic mustard plants from the nature preserve at the Historic Shupe Homestead, Col. Nahorn spotted a match set of deer antlers not more than 5 feet from each other.  The antlers are sturdy and quite heavy duty in form.  Of course the bucks lose their antlers each season, shedding them across the landscape.  We are very excited about this antler shed find right here at the Homestead!  April 5, 2017

Well-Preserved Bottled Donated

This well-preserved, Civil War-era ‘medicine’ bottle, with original tag and cork still in place, was found and donated by a local Amherst resident while working on their home basement foundation.   

A “nostrum,” developed by Dr. Jacob Hostetter, of Lancaster, PA., his son, David, put the formula into large-scale production in 1853.  Soon it became a best-seller.  It was used heavily during the Civil War and was marketed as “a positive protective against the fatal maladies of Southern swamps and poisonous tendency of impure rivers and bayous.”  The original formula contained about 47% alcohol and was 94 proof.  Often it was served in Alaskan saloons by the glass.  The alcohol was sweetened with additives of sugar, aromatic oils, and vegetable bitters to provide medicinal ‘flavor.’

The bottle, dating to the early to mid-1860s, was found and donated by Kevin and son Nathan Henceforth, while excavating in their basement on Park Ave., Amherst.  January 10, 2017. 

Watershed Awareness Annual Open House

 

What is a watershed?  How does land-use affect water quality and stream bank integrity?  These were some broad-based questions we tried to address in the annual Watershed Open House held at the Historic Vermilion-on-the-Lake Community Clubhouse.  The building, once a bustling dance hall among several like it along the Lake Shore, this one in the style of a rustic log cabin, is nearly a century old.  The event was long-organized by the late Bob Sasala, now Barb Brady has taken a lead role in holding this important, educational event.

Col. Nahorn once again represented the Beaver Creek Watershed Group, an affiliate of the New Indian Ridge Museum, at this event.  We displayed maps, documents, and graphics highlighting watershed awareness and particularly what landowners can do to reduce impact on area creeks and rivers.  “Education is key,” Nahorn stated, as he shared voluntary actions landowners can take around their property, such as maintaining a well-vegetated riparian buffer along all streams (both regularly and intermittently flowing); reducing lawn fertilizer use; installing a rain barrel; using permeable surfaces and pavers instead of concrete; and using native vegetation in landscaping.  We were very pleased with attendance both regarding display participants and those who came to visit the displays. 

(Photography courtesy Jean Rounds, NIRM)   April 1, 2017