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Native Wildflowers Abound in the Area

Here are a few views of native wildflowers and plants in our area (May 2015):

Fragile ferns and wood ferns thrive in this intermittent wetland, which is a part of the ephemeral headwaters stream known as Shupe Creek.  It eventually flows into Beaver Creek at the Historic Shupe Homestead in Amherst.

Fragile ferns and wood ferns thrive in this intermittent wetland, which is a part of the ephemeral headwaters stream known as Shupe Creek. It eventually flows into Beaver Creek at the Historic Shupe Homestead in Amherst.  Also note the emerging jewelweed native wildflower.

Native large flowered trillium wildflowers grow to enormous sizes at the Old Spring site in downtown Amherst.  The sandy, moist soil conditions of the ancient beach ridge provide a perfect spot for our State's wildflower.

Native large flowered trillium wildflowers grow to enormous sizes at the Old Spring site in downtown Amherst. The sandy, moist soil conditions of the ancient beach ridge provide a perfect spot for our State’s wildflower.

Large specimens of bloodroot wildflowers grow on the hillside at the Old Spring.

Large specimens of bloodroot wildflowers grow on the hillside at the Old Spring site.

Trillium and may apples thrive at the Old Spring site.

Trillium and may apples thrive at the Old Spring site.

Ostrich ferns are seen here in the rich bottomland floodplain forests of the Vermilion River floodplain at the Bacon Woods metropark system.

Ostrich ferns are seen here in the rich bottomland floodplain forests of the Vermilion River floodplain at the Bacon Woods metropark system.