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Spring Projects Begin at NIRM Wildlife Preserve

We will update you on this posting as various parts of our outdoor wildlife maintenance programs begin or continue here at the Homestead. 

A great view of the floodplain wetland along Beaver Creek at the Historic Shupe Homestead.  Note the buttonbush, on left, and the green dragon wildflowers in front of and behind the fallen oak tree.  Green dragons are comparatively rare and indicate that the original forest floor cover is still intact.

A great view of the floodplain wetland along Beaver Creek at the Historic Shupe Homestead. Note the buttonbush, on left, and the green dragon wildflowers in front of and behind the fallen oak tree. Green dragons, a relative of the jack-in-the-pulpit, are comparatively rare and indicate that the original forest floor cover is still intact.  (6/2014)

Floodplain and Beaver Creek at Historic Shupe Homestead.

Floodplain and Beaver Creek at Historic Shupe Homestead.

As seen below, native wildflowers, the white and yellow trout-lilly are prominently featured in the Historic Shupe Homestead Wildlife Preserve woods, along the Beaver Creek in Amherst.

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Spring is here, and that means numerous outdoor projects are planned, and some are already underway, here at the New Indian Ridge Museum’s Wildlife Preserve at the Historic Shupe Homestead.

Pure stand of may apples at the Preserve.

Vernal Pool information and Headwaters of Shupe Creek:  IMG_1023

April 29, 2014  A relatively small infestation of the non-native and invasive lesser celandine plant has been found in the floodplain of the Beaver Creek here at the Wildlife Preserve.  We have been actively working to eradicate the non-native invasive garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata), and while doing that, we noticed the lesser celandine (Ranunculus ficaria).  This plant will grow into large mats and not allow any native plants to grow in that area.  The mat growth pattern of this invasive plant can become enormous.  Complicating the plant’s removal, it has tubers and reproduces through these structures.  Therefore, in order to successfully eradicate the plant, it must be dug out, including surrounding soil, and all components completely discarded.

Shown here is the infestation of lesser celadine.

Shown here is the infestation of lesser celandine.

April 13, 2014 We took a tour of the preserve today in order to assess the initial situation with regard to the invasive garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolataplant.  Some plants were removed, and we will continue to work to work on this project.  Invasive rose bushes, Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), and grape vines (Vitis spp.) will also be part of the continuing removal project.  It was noted that trout-lily (Erythronium spp.), spring beauty (Claytonia virginica), trillium (Trillium spp.) – Ohio’s state wildflower, and even may apple (Podophyllum peltatum) wildflowers are popping up all over the rich woods.  The vernal pools are full, and more rain is expected.

Native may apple wildflowers are already popping up on the forest floor.

Native may apple wildflowers are already popping up on the forest floor.

Vernal pool at the preserve.

Vernal pool at the preserve.

March 17, 2014  We have already begun pruning fruit trees in the Orchard section of the property.  Care will also soon be given to our native trees collection in the property’s Arboretum.

Soon we will also embark on our non-native, invasive species program in order to inhibit growth of those species while promoting growth of native plants, wildflowers, trees, &c.  This program is designed to promote spring wildflowers, which are especially vulnerable.  By doing this, we are aiding in maintaining biodiversity and species richness.

Fruit tree pruning has begun in the Orchard section of the property.  March 17, 2014.

Fruit tree pruning has begun in the Orchard section of the property. March 17, 2014.